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  • Resiliency

    Resilience sign with a desert backgroundGuest Post By: Gary Michels

    Oxford Dictionaries defines resiliency as, “the ability to recoil or spring back into shape after bending, stretching, or being compressed” Often resilience is defined as the capacity to withstand stress and catastrophe and Bounce Back Quickly (BBF), which I talk about often. Of course depending on what has happened in your life will determine how quickly you bounce back, however sitting in the gutter and having the PLOM Disease (Poor Little Old Me) rarely serves anybody well.

    Last evening I saw a short video about Chris Singleton who unfortunately lost his mother back in June of 2015 in the terrible shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. I was so inspired by this video I had to write about Chris’s and the community’s resilience. Less than 48 hours after his mother was shot dead Chris came out publicly and said, “We have already forgiven the shooter for what he has done and there is nothing but love from our side of the family.” The community so rallied in love and wanting to fix the problem this reaction instead of going into riot mode and making things worse. There was a massive feeling of resiliency of bouncing back quickly and even wanting to be better than things were before the incident.

    So what are some tips and ideas on how to be more resilient:

    1. Build and nurture close relationships with friends and family so when things do happen, and they will, the people around you are supportive and strong.

    2.  Write, and read often, positive affirmations to be constantly pouring into your mind positive thoughts and feelings. For example, “I am a person that bounces back from adversity quickly and appropriately” or “I feel happy, wonderful and terrific and will let nothing bring me down further than I want or deserve to be.”

    3. When you truly are down for one reason or another don’t be afraid to seek professional help. There is no stigma placed on you for having a counselor or coach or good friend advise you for ways to be better.

    4. Stay healthy in both body and mind. Exercise in some fashion at least a few days a week and eat appropriately to give yourself the proper fuel to live on. Also take some time regularly to read some positive type of material and average of 15 minutes a day as often as possible. Remember the famous statement of “Input = Output” What you out into your mind will give you the results you want.

    5. Try to get your mind off of yourself and be a servant to others. When you have mastered being a giver it makes you so much stronger when times are tough and it is time to bounce back. You have no time to sit in your misery and pout. There are others out there that need the “Positive You” back!!

    To bounce back quickly from adversity and be resilient is a powerful characteristic to master. Take the bull by the horns and make an effort now to really grow in this area of your life and watch things flourish all around you.

     

    Gary Michels is a co-founder of Southwestern Consulting.  He is a keynote speaker, sales trainer and business consultant and has motivated nearly 1,000,000 people to achieve their highest potential nationwide. Gary spent 19 successful years as a sales representative for a national fund-raising company.


  • Rory Vaden in Huffington Post: The High Cost of Always Being ‘Right’

    After years of coaching successful professionals in a variety of disciplines, I’ve come to see that when conflicts arise, many of us tend to care more about being “right” than we do about finding the best course of action.

    I’m sure you’ve experienced this in your own life, at the office and perhaps at home too. A disagreement arises, and we’re so afraid of “losing” that we won’t even admit there’s a possibility that there might be more to the situation than we can see. In our determination to “win,” we refuse to acknowledge the other person’s perspective.

    As is often the case when we let ourselves be guided solely by our emotions, there are substantial consequences. Here are the three biggest ones. . .

    Read the rest of this article on Huffington Post