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  • Whether You Believe It or Not, It’s Probably True

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

     

    “Whether You Believe It or Not, It’s Probably True.” That’s actually one of my very favorite quotes because I actually do believe that.

    true

    What I have found in my own personal life is that when I believe I can do something, I typically find a way. If I don’t really believe that something can happen, I rationalize my way out of trying to make it work.

    Have you ever done the same thing?

    Here’s the biggest question for this week’s blog:

    What do you believe that is actually possible in your life?

    Now that’s a really big and somewhat vague question because it could be personal, professional, or about your fitness life. It could even be about your financial life, your career, or your relationships. But the question remains the same.

    What do you believe in your life that you actually think can come true?

    That’s what I want to pause and think about this week.

    It’s Sunday night and I’m actually driving to a study with some of my girlfriends. As I sit and think about that question to myself, one of the things I notice that happens quite often is I immediately go to the realistic.

    I immediately go to things that are already in motion. I already think, “What are things that already have a track to run on and what do I just need to finish?” I wonder about the things that seem possible.

    I rarely think about the things that seem impossible. What are the things that could happen with a little creativity and ingenuity? Who are the people in my life who could help me make impossible things possible?

    Regardless of where you are and what, you believe on this stance here’s one thing I know to be true:

    Mind really does overcome matter.  

    If you believe something, more than likely you can find a way to make that become a reality.

    I also believe the opposite. If you don’t believe something is possible, you’ll never give it enough attention, effort, or resources for it to even become a glimmer of hope in your imagination.

    As you read this blog this week, I hope it helps you challenge your thinking with one thing:

    What is potentially impossible that actually could be possible with a little creativity, a little willpower, and the right people coming together to help you?

     

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide.  Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between  Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow-Up.

    To visit Amanda Johns Vaden’s website, click here.


  • Keys to Successful First Impressions 

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    impression

    The Harvard Study of Communications said that it only takes seven seconds for you to make a first impression on another human being, only seven seconds. I think that study is so fascinating because of this one little thing. How many words do you really say in seven seconds?

    Do a seven-second countdown in your head right now.

    I bet you got out something like I did which was “Hi, it’s so nice to meet you. My name’s Amanda.” That took about 4 seconds

    What else could we possibly say in the next three seconds that’s going to make some overwhelmingly positive first impression?  The truth is probably not a whole lot.

    In fact, one of the parts of this study actually says that 38% of what makes up a first impression is how you sound. Only 7% of a first impression are the words you say. So all together, only 45% of a first impression has anything to do with the words coming out of your mouth.  That leaves 55% of a first impression to visual. It’s how you look, it’s how you dress. It’s how you stand, it’s how you shake a hand. It’s if you make solid eye contact. It’s your personal appearance.

    So many times, we focus on what to say to make a first impression. Well, studies show it’s not as much what you say, and again only 7% of the first impression had anything to do with the words that you say.

    Pay attention, very acutely, to how you spend those first seven seconds that will visually capture your prospect or customer.

    Do you stand up to greet them? Do you make eye contact with them? Do you immediately smile at them? How are you dressed? How are you standing? Do you stand up straight and confident? Do you remain seated? Do you shake their hand, or do you hug them? Do you light up with excitement? Or is it just an expected, “Hey, how are you?”

    You may be thinking those little things don’t make a difference, but they do. Don’t let your first impression be you texting someone else, and those first seven seconds are gone in a glimmer. Don’t be afraid to be yourself. Be prepared that when they come in, that they have a visual first impression of you that’s going to last.

    Make your first impression count.

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide.  Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between  Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow-Up.


  • 3 Natural By-Products of Staying in Touch with Your Customers  

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    The most inexpensive way for you to get more business is to sell to existing clients.

    Existing clients are more likely to give you referrals to more potential leads. And it’s easier to up-sell an existing client when you do it for the right reasons and at the right time. In fact, studies have shown that it takes three times more money and effort to find new prospects as it does to just keep the ones you have. We’re going to share with you three reasons why following-up with clients is crucial and essential to the success of selling.

    Show Gratitude:

    • It’s important to follow-up just to say, “Thank you.” It’s amazing how those two little words can incredibly change the trajectory of your client relationship. When your customers know that you are appreciative and grateful for their business, it creates loyalty.
    • Whether you do it with a handwritten card, a gift, a phone call, or an email, just make sure that you are authentic and consistent when saying thank you. Never underestimate the power of the written word or hearing something on a regular basis.

    Minimize Buyer’s Remorse

    • Make sure that you follow-up quickly because the quicker you follow-up, the less likely someone is to change their mind.
    • You want to do it immediately upfront. You want to create that sense of urgency as if to say, “I am here for you and you made a good choice.”
    • Stay constant in your follow-up so that you can help address challenges before they ever become problems. If you follow-up on a regular basis and you find out things aren’t working, whether their prices increased, their policy changed or taxes are going to be higher on something, whatever it is, if you catch it, you’re just doing them a service. But if they catch it, it’s a problem.

    Gain Word of Mouth Advertising

    • Having a good relationship with your customers isn’t just good for business; it also increases the amount of positive word of mouth. With the over-abundance of social media sites, there’s too much opportunity to spread bad news.
    • You have to make sure they are sharing good news. Unfortunately, most people are seven times more likely to share bad news than they are good news. If you follow-up consistently, you can build word of mouth prospects and generate word of mouth advertising.

    Now that you know why it’s important to follow up, you have all the more reason to begin doing it!

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide.  Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between  Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow Up


  • Three Things that I Wish I Knew Before I Started Selling

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    Something that most people don’t know is that our company, Southwestern Consulting, is actually the training and consulting arm of a much larger corporation known as The Southwestern Company. In fact, The Southwestern Company is the oldest direct selling company in the entire United States.

    We’ve been around for just shy of 160 years but I’ve been in the sales profession for only 10 years and what I have realized is that I wish I had another 150 years of experience to prepare me for the daily ups and downs of being a professional salesperson. In light of that I thought I would share 3 simple, but impactful tips I wish I knew before I started in sales almost 10 years ago:

    1. It’s harder than it sounds – I really wish I knew how hard I was going to have to work. I knew that being in sales wouldn’t be easy but I wish I knew how hard it was going to be as a salesperson. I wish somebody would have sat down and told me.

    “You’re going to have to have a lot of perseverance. You’re going to have to be very persistent. You’re going to have to work when you don’t want to. You’re going to have to work longer hours than you thought. Sometimes you’re going to have to  work on weekends. Sometimes you’re going to have to miss parties, and events, and weddings, because you’re going to have to work.”

    I wish I would’ve been prepared so that when it came time to work that hard, I didn’t get upset. That I didn’t resent the fact that this was my job.

    I’ve finally learned how to really love the daily grind of working hard and today I really take pride in the fact I’m part of a job that I’m so passionate about it doesn’t feel like work.

    But many times as a salesperson, we start to feel unbalanced because we didn’t have the proper expectations of how hard we’re going to have to work.

     

    2. You have to want to be better each and every day – Being a great salesperson means it’s a never ending pursuit of learning. And again, like working hard, I really learned to love that about what I do at Southwestern Consulting. I am very blessed to be a part of an entire company who is passionate about learning and self-development.

    However, when I first started in this job one of the first things I was most excited about was, “I can’t wait ’til I know what I’m doing so I don’t have to study so hard anymore.”

    Guess what, I’m still not there. Almost 10 years later, I’m still not there.

    I wish I would’ve known that the books that I read were going to teach me more than any classes I ever attended in college. I wish somebody would’ve said, “Buy these books. Listen to these audio trainings. Go to these seminars. Find mentors. Get a coach. Find an accountability partner.  Study hard. Really be a student of the game. Listen to people. Ask for advice. Be a never ending learner.”

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    3. I will never arrive at being at the top of my game – For 10 yrs I have looked forward to the day when I have “finally arrived” only to realize that day does not exist and ultimately should not exist in my mind. The moment I actually think I have arrived will be the day I need a reality check.

    Every day I have to push aside what I think is right and to listen to others. I have to be coachable. Learning to be flexible is never easy, but being stubborn doesn’t help anyone. Be open to trying new things, even when you think you know everything…. Because, guess what, you don’t … but, neither does anyone else.

    Whether it’s your first day in sales or your first year or you’re a long time veteran and you’ve been selling for 50 plus years, it doesn’t matter. Those three things never change. You have to work hard, study hard, and be coachable if you’re going to succeed at anything.

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide.  Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between  Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow Up


  • Selling to Baby Boomers

    Baby boomers are one of the largest generations currently in the US workforce.

    Large portions of them are the decision makers in their workplace. Meaning that a vast majority of the decision makers are between the ages of 50 and 70.

    How do we sell, communicate, and build relationships with this generation?

    The first thing you need to know is that their preferred, number one form of communication is the telephone.

    This generation is busy, some of the busiest people in all the generations. They are running businesses, sales teams, marketing departments. They travel. They have executive decision-making power.

    Conference calls and scheduling one on one calls are some of the best ways to reach them. Also, leaving voicemails is very effective with this generation.

    The second fact about the Baby Boomer generation is that they are still the number one generation most likely to open, read, and respond to direct mail.

    That’s right, snail mail, people. They’re actually looking at all that stuff the U.S. Postal Service is sending and putting in our mailboxes.

    >> Click here to continue reading on Amanda Johns Vaden’s blog <<


  • Selling to the Mature Generation

    How do you sell and communicate to a market with multiple generations?

    Today is the first time in U.S. history that we have four completely different generations all working together in the exact same workforce.

    So what do you need to know when selling or just communicating to the mature generation?

    The mature generation is technically defined as those people age 70 and up.

    Knowing this alone, it’s safe to say they are the most loyal generation.

    I’ve heard many people say that they are tagged as the Cadillac generation because people of this generation have had every version of the Cadillac since it came out. They are loyal to the brand.

    How do you use that to your advantage? Do a good job, be honest, and they will be loyal to you.

    What’s most important to them is relationships. You have to change the way you communicate with them. Texting, emails, and phone calls won’t do it for them.

    You need to do it in person. As much as possible, you need to meet with the mature generation in person.

    >> Click here to continue reading on Amanda Johns Vaden’s blog <<


  • Are you easy to communicate with in the workplace?

    Guest post by: Amanda Johns Vaden

    Since we are in a blog series based on a recent research study I completed at Southwestern Consulting™, I thought I would share another interesting statistic this week.

    When our research participants were asked about their ease of communicating with both the same sex and the opposite sex, we unearthed some startling information.

    We asked 100 individuals (51% male and 49% female) to rate the ease of communicating with the same sex versus the opposite sex on a scale of 1-10 (1 being highly difficult and 10 indicating a high level of ease). We expected women to report that it’s easier for them to communicate with other women and men to report that it’s easier to communicate with other men.  Was our hypothesis right?

    Nope!

    [CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING]


  • 3 Step Process to Live Your Life Instead of It Living You

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    “If I could just get half the things done on my list, I wouldn’t feel so overloaded!” If this is you, let’s take a timeout to explore some time management strategies.

    Of course, I’ve heard many clients say they don’t have time for planning. That’s a big red flag. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”, “Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance”, “Failing to plan is planning to fail”, take your pick – we’ve heard the warnings – let’s understand this much – You will gain by making time for Time!

    Here is a 3-step process that can help you feel like YOU are living your life – instead of life living you!

    –> Click here to continue reading…


  • My Favorite Closing Technique: The 1 to 10 Close

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    Screen shot 2014-08-07 at 5.30.34 PM

    Today we are going to cover my number one favorite close which is what we call the 1 to 10 close. It’s a scale of 1 to 10. So this is how you use this close and then we can talk about where you use it. So how do you use this close, it’s probably going to sound something like this…

    “Now Mr. Prospect on a scale of 1 to 10, 1 being completely non-existent and 10 being absolutely I’m ready to do this today where would you say that you fall on a scale of 1 to 10?”

    Then you pause and you wait for them to give you an answer. Now here is the best part of using this close, regardless of what they say the real magic happens next. So if they tell you they’re a 7 you’re next statement is this…

    –> Click here to continue reading…


  • REPUTATION RESTORATION // FEATURED IN MODEL RETAILER MAGAZINE

    “People are a lot nastier through email and online than through the phone,” says Amanda Johns Vaden, senior partner at Southwestern Consulting. “It’s much easier to be aggressive online.”

    Reputation_Restoration

    Download the article with Senior Partner, Amanda Johns Vaden, featured in Modern Retailer Magazine

    Right Here