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  • Category Archives Answering Objections
  • The “Perfect” Game

    Guest Post By: Gary Michels

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    This game is more of a challenge, I challenge you to view the world as “perfect.” Perfect exactly the way it is and the way it is not. Regardless of your circumstances, you need to view the world as perfect. Begin this challenge by figuring out right now how everything that has ever happened to you has been the perfect thing. You also need to decide that where you have been and what you have done in your life thus far, has led you to where you are today.

    Why is today perfect? You are alive! You have a body that functions! You have opportunities to contribute to the good of mankind and help others achieve happiness. Go ahead, choose anything in your life and declare it perfect. Do it right now! What is perfect in your life? Why is it perfect?

    Every time something happens to you, especially if it is something that was not exactly how you planned it, declare it to be “Perfect!” Then, thank the Universe for bringing that experience to you and allowing you to learn from it. Without failures in your life, you will never know the taste of success. Ask yourself what can be learned from this? How can I grow? Is the action or event you are experiencing teaching you how to be more patient, more of a risk taker, be more giving… or is it giving you feedback letting you know where you are now and what areas of your personality do you want to continue to work on?

    If your leader or manager tells you the commission rate is going down, say “Perfect, I was wondering how I was going to break through barriers and make more sales. Should a prospect you have been counting on to purchase your product or service, suddenly decide not to, you need to say to yourself, “Perfect”. Then, you say to yourself something along the lines of : “I was getting too attached to that deal anyway. I found myself feeling off-kilter because I was so desperate for that one particular sale. The Universe will always provide for me as long as I mean well and work hard.”

    Start playing this “Perfect” game with those around you. Ask yourself what is right about this person? Why have they entered my life? What do I like about them? What are their positive attributes? How can I honor them? You must strive to always be in the “perfect” mindset. It is knowing you are experiencing each moment for a specific reason.

    Remember to ask yourself:

    1. What is perfect today?
    2. What is perfect about my career?
    3. What is perfect about my life?
    4. What is perfect about myself?

     

    Gary Michels is a co-founder of Southwestern Consulting. He is a keynote speaker, sales trainer and business consultant and has motivated nearly 1,000,000 people to achieve their highest potential nationwide. Gary spent 19 successful years as a sales representative for a national fund-raising company.


  • “I’m Sorry” & Customer Service

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    While reading  new book that I got turned on to called “#GIRLBOSS” by Sophia Amoruso, one of the things she talks about is how important it is to apologize to your customers when things go wrong. Here’s what I believe when it comes to saying, “I’m sorry,” in regards to customer service.

    I believe that you should always take responsibility when things don’t go right in your company. Many times it’s going to be your fault, and many times it’s not. Regardless, they’re still your customers.

    We’ve all heard that old adage saying, “The customer is always right.” Let’s just be honest, that’s not true. The customer is not always right. But regardless, they are still your customers.

    And here’s what I’ve noticed as a customer and a consumer of many types of things: I don’t hear “I am so sorry” or “Let us fix that for you”. In fact, most times, the person on the other line or the person standing behind the counter is trying to inform me why it was my fault, why this didn’t go right, or trying to give me some logical explanation as to why this happened.

    Here’s what I know about apologizing. The more you try to defend yourself or the more you try to reason, the more defensive the other person’s going to get. Although I don’t necessarily believe that you should be sorry for everything that your customers are unhappy about, here’s what I know:

    The quicker that you respond with a genuine empathetic, “I’m sorry this happened to you,” you’re not saying, “I am sorry we did this. I’m sorry that we failed you.” You are saying, “I am sorry that you feel this way. I am sorry that this was your experience.”

    If you can show genuine empathy quickly, all of the negative attitudes tend to diminish. It’s when we don’t apologize. It’s when we don’t take responsibility. It’s when we don’t make an effort to show our customers that we appreciate them as customers that things turn ugly.

    And let’s just be honest. In the world of social media and online feedback, no one can afford a constant barrage of unhappy customers because if you keep your customers unhappy long enough, you’re just not going to have any customers.

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide. Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow-Up


  • The “Boomerang” Sales Technique

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden
    boomerang

    One of the most common objections in sales is typically one that can easily throw off your sales presentation entirely. This is because when you hear it, you’re not prepared to answer it…. Yet.

    You’ve all been through a process where you’re just getting started, you’re just asking questions about the potential client’s needs, you get to your presentation, and all of a sudden your prospect cuts you off and says, “Amanda, I’m totally with you, but it’s all going to depend on the price. So just go ahead and just tell me. I need to know what we’re working with here.”

    Before you even get to find their need, before you present value, they’re cutting you off and immediately want to know the price.

    Now that’s a tricky situation because you just can’t evade the question, right? There are people who are going to catch on to that. It’s not going to help you and it’s definitely going to not build trust with your prospective customers.

    But how do you avoid answering that when you’re not prepared to tell them yet? That’s important to remember because upfront you are not prepared to tell them that.

    Because the moment you share the price, poof! Your entire sale just went up in flames because everything they hear after that, it’s all about the money. It’s all about the price.

    You can’t tell them the price until you’ve found a problem. The problem has to be bigger than the price, which is why you can’t tell people how much it is upfront.

    How do you get around it? How do you not completely evade the question, build trust, and eventually get back to it with your customer?

    This is what we call the “boomerang” technique. It’s one of my favorite questions to ask and I love asking it because it’s a game. I use this as a game with myself in all conversations.

    The boomerang is just defined as, “answering any question that you’re not prepared to answer with a question.” If you think about it, any question in the world that you get, can be answered with another question.

    For this specific objection “How much is it,” here is what you want to say, “Hey, I completely understand this is something you want to know and I promise we’re going to get to that. But at this point, I really don’t have enough information to even give you a quote or even guess how much it is. However, if you let me ask you a couple of quick questions, I can get straight to that. Is that fair?”

    In nine out of 10 times they’re going to say, “Sure, that’s fair.”

    So let them know it’s not going to take a long time, you are going to get to it, but you have to cover just a couple of quick things first and then you’ll get right to it. So again, it’s called the boomerang question.

    Answer their questions, their objections with a question so you don’t get off-guard upfront. You want them to focus on their problems and how you can help solve them, not the price.

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide.  Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between  Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow-Up


  • Sales Tips: 5 Scripts to Handle Blow Off Objections

    From: Dew Tinnin

    Dew Tinnin

    When I started my sales career, I was given a script and I started dialing. Like most salespeople, I was given basic scripts to handle common objections like price. But I wasn’t trained on how to overcome blow off objections – the lame excuses I heard when someone was just trying to blow me off.

    • “Send me some information.”
    • “I’m happy in my current situation.”
    • “I need some time to think about it.”

    I lost deal after deal until I finally learned how to keep from being blown off. Just like any objection, the best way to overcome the blow off is to write out a power statement script that is in your own words. I’ve started some sample scripts for you – feel free to take these and make them your own.

    1. “Can you just send me some information?”

    “Absolutely, what’s your email address? Now [name], I want to be absolutely sure that the information I send you is what you’re looking for. If you were in my situation sending information to you, what would you be sure to include?”

    For the rest of these tips visit Sales Coach Dew’s blog here.


  • THE BEST WAYS TO HANDLE OBJECTIONS

    Cover them up front

    For example, if you’re having a tough time getting in front of the ultimate decision maker because your champion is wanting to present it without you, then plant the seed during your first meeting that you’re always part of the sales process:

    “Bill, what I enjoy about my job is I see my role as a trusted advisor so with that in mind, here’s what you can expect from me: I’ll take some time to ask you questions to really understand your situation. From there I’ll put together a solution specific to your goals and we’ll set a date for me to demo the right widget for you. From there, I’ll put together a proposal based on your goals and the results of the demo and we’ll set a time to do a proposal review, to walk through it together. This is important because the proposal will be a working proposal. IE it will be a first draft to make sure that it’s spot on and in reviewing it together we might determine if there are any gaps that we need to fill to make sure it’s exactly what you’re looking for. Does that make sense?”

    (Yes)

    “And when I review the proposal, I like to make sure I’m presenting it to everybody who’s part of the decision-making process. With that in mind, who else will be part of making that decision? (My boss, Joe Smith.) “Great, it’ll be important that Joe’s involved in the process because as you know, widgets can be pretty technical with all of their unique features and it’s next to impossible for somebody to explain it well having limited exposure to it compared to somebody like myself who’s been doing this for over 24 years. Does that make sense?”

    By planting the seeds early, you’re covering those objections you tend to get later on like, “No need to review the proposal together. Why don’t you just send it to me and I’ll call you.” Because you addressed this earlier, you will often head off this objection from ever coming up and if does you can remind him of what the two of you agreed to earlier. By explaining at the beginning that you always present the product to all of the decision makers, you’re covering the objection in advance, “No need for you to present it to Joe. I can do that myself.”

     

    In addition to planting the seed early on how you always present to the decision maker, and additional strategy to answer the objection upfront is to send an introduction email to the ultimate decision maker right after your first meeting with your champion. The outline for the email might look like this:

     

    Subjection Line: “Per Meeting with Bill Jones”

    “Hi Joe. I just wanted to introduce myself to you real quick in case you haven’t heard of me yet. I’m with Widgets USA and had the pleasure of sitting down with Bill Jones today to discuss some of our newer widgets. After being in the industry for 24+ years, I wanted to let you know how impressed I was with your operation and Bill Jones in particular. After working with hundreds of people in his position it was a breath of fresh air to sit down with Bill. He’s an expert in his field and represents your company exceptionally well and wanted you to know that. As Bill and I continue to move down the field together, I wanted to make sure that I introduced myself so that when Bill mentions my name it will not catch you off guard. I look forward to making your acquaintance!”

     

    This introduction email serves multiple purposes. (1) Your champion appreciates the kudos you gave him to his boss. (2) The decision maker appreciates you saying nice things about his company and is impressed with you keeping him in the loop. (3) It heads off the objection, “You don’t need to present this to Joe – I can handle it.”

     

    Selling is a lot like playing pool in the sense that you want to set yourself up for success. Amateur pool players only take it one shot at a time. Professionals, however, plan the entire game in advance, setting themselves up for future shots. In the same sense, professional salespeople consider the objections they might get down the stretch and cover them in advance.

     

    Please feel free to share your best objection handling techniques below. Be a part of our mission: Liberating Sales Potential Worldwide!

     

    Action Items:

    ·  Review and role-play the above method for answering objections.

    ·  Write a list of common objections and come up with a strategy for covering them in advance.

     

    Your Partner in Success,

    Steve Reiner

    Professional Certified Coach

     

     

    www.southwesternconsulting.com

    sreiner@southwesternconsulting.com


  • The Price Build Up

    BY: Dustin Hillis

    Through training at the Southwestern Company, I’ve learned many of the best selling techniques in business.  This is one of the best “The Price Build Up”.

    The price build up is something that anyone can use whenever they have to deliver the price to the potential customer. If you have people ask you how much your service or product cost, then this technique is for you!

    There are three steps in this technique, and it is very efficient and effective for getting people to wrap their mind around the value of your service and making them feel as if the price is the best one that is out there on the market.

    Step 1:  To start with, you want to build the price up. You do that by researching and finding out how much your product costs in other industries or other markets. How much is your competition charging?  For example, if you are selling a high-end pen and you know that your pen is not the most expensive and there are more sets of pens out there, find the most expensive one. For example, a Mon Blanc pen costs two hundred and fifty dollars and our pen only cost two hundred dollars. That is a good price comparison for you to have.

    Step 2: Then you do the next step of price build up which is dropping the bottom out of the price. And how you drop the bottom out is you say, “the main reason why people like to do business with us is that instead of being $3000 or $2500 or even $2000 per month, for our service it is only $475, that’s not bad is it?” Once you say that, the psychology is such that they are thinking $3000, $2500, or even $2000 the next logical order of sequence would be $1,500. By saying $497 it drops the bottom out of what they think it is going to be.

    Step 3: The next step, step number three of the price build up, is attaching emotion to the price. Have some kind of story that one of your customers has given you in the past were they gave you a story about how they are so thankful for using your service. A good example would be with insurance; if somebody took advantage of your service and ended up having to use your insurance, tell a story about that right after you deliver the price.

    If you complete those three steps successfully, where you build the price up and make them feel it is going to be worth the value much greater than it actually is. Then you drop the bottom out of the price and, finally, attach an emotional connection to the value of the price, you will consistently have people tell you “that is not bad” regardless of what your price point is.

    For more sales insight and success stories about implementing the tips you find here, check out the resources at the Southwestern Company or on my BLOG: Selling the Way People Like to Buy.