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  • 3 Essentials of a Mountain-Moving Compliment

    Guest Post By: Ron Alford

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Robyn Lee taught me an incredibly powerful lesson. Robyn is UCLA grad who I got to lead over the course of 6 years while she worked with Southwestern, and she taught me the power of a well-delivered compliment and how it can change the trajectory of a person’s life. Robyn didn’t share this lesson with me by telling me. She showed me. (She may not even realize she taught me this, but she will now!)

    It took her less than a minute to write this out:

    Robyn complimented me in a way that was moving and memorable. She remembered a compliment I gave her four long years earlier and it made a difference like no other statement had before. In the moment, I had no idea the impact that could have made.

    Years later, she made me a book that has meant as much to me in my professional life as anything I’ll ever receive. A book full of compliments from people I worked with over 20 years.

    These compliments have fueled me for the past four years and not only moved mountains in my life but the lives of those I have had the privilege of impacting.  These compliments have fueled me for the past four years and not only moved mountains in my life but the lives of those I have had the privilege of impacting.

    Compliments have the ability to lift someone up and tap into something inside them that they didn’t know was there.
    There are three keys to maximizing the power of a compliment, which will allow that compliment to better serve, impact, and move mountains:

    Specific. Saying “You are nice” or “You are great” is well meant, but vague and less moving. Saying “I love the way you smile when you greet people” or “I always appreciate how you are on time and respect those around you” is specific and usually taken with more gratitude.

    Sincere. We all know what it feels like when someone speaks to us with a genuineness that is memorable. Maya Angelou said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel,” which perfectly captures this idea. The tone of voice and warm facial expression often can mean even more than the actual words.

    Intentional. Timing is everything. Often, spontaneity can make a difference. I’ll work with leaders of teams and companies to think through times of the day or week when giving a compliment will be unexpected and therefore mean more. Grabbing someone after a meeting for a quick one-on-one moment, complimenting someone in a group setting, or even a hand-written note, text, or voicemail can all be just as meaningful. The key is you either look for times to lift others up or you don’t. The essence of serving is being intentional about it.

    There is a power of life and death in our words. We need to use them wisely. I often realize I fall short in this department as a husband, father, and a leader. I can look back and distinctly see the times I was the most joyful was when I was my best at intentionally lifting others up.

    Sometimes it is the person we would never guess who could benefit the most from a specific and sincere compliment. Crazy enough, but often it is the very thing we think someone knows they bring to the table that we need to compliment.
    Make sure you don’t ever miss an opportunity to be intentional and deliver a mountain-moving compliment. Everyone wins when you do.

     

    Ron Alford is a certified Top Producer Consultant Sales and Leadership Coach. He specializes in teaching ethical sales techniques and strategies that individuals and teams can use to immediately grow their sales. He is an expert when it comes to recruiting, sales training and coaching individuals and teams to reach higher than they ever imagined.


  • Can This Sales Manager Be Saved?

    Guest Post By: Kitty Barrow

     

    Last year, I was coaching a business owner who was constantly complaining about her sales manager. When asked, the owner explained that they initially let the new sales manager do as he wished because they didn’t want to hinder his ability to lead. Upon further questioning, the owner said that the manager was never given any expectations or a list of what success looks like for their job. It was really no wonder that the sales manager wasn’t doing everything the owner expected. It was never explained to him what she expected.

    Not every problem is ever solved too easily and this was no exception. At this point, the manager had been working at doing whatever he pleased for more than 6 months, and as the owner tried to work with him on what was expected of him, instead of agreement, they were butting heads. The owner was complaining to me about everything the manager was doing wrong, the things the manager seemed to be intentionally not doing, and how the manager kept messing up despite being told how to do things over and over.

    It was almost Christmas when the owner decided that she needed to fire the manager, but didn’t want to do it over the holidays, so decided she would do it the beginning of January. Yikes! The manager’s job was on the line if things didn’t change fast.

    At this point, we started working on Navigate, the book by my business partners Dustin Hillis and Steve Reiner. This involved figuring out the sales manager’s personality type so that the owner could lead him how he would like to be lead. In the discussion, we discovered that the sales manager was a Counselor personality type while the business owner was a Fighter. These are two completely different personality types. While Fighters do have very good traits, under stress, the Fighter tends to make demands and only focus on what people are doing wrong. The exact opposite is the Counselor, who under stress tends to clam up and become almost passive aggressive.

    It was a hard pill to swallow but our business owner decided to sit down with the manager and see the world through a Counselor’s eyes. Counselors tend to be all about making sure that everyone is happy. They have an opinion but they aren’t going to share it when they feel under attack. Counselor personality types can be some of the best team players as long as they feel that they are truly an integral part of the team.

    It was an “aha” moment for our business owner as she realized that when she was selling, she always “navigated” people’s personality styles, but when it came to running her company, she never felt that she needed to “work that hard.” In reality, once you make leading the way others like to lead a habit, it becomes second nature to you.

    Good news! Almost immediately the relationship between the business owner and her sales manager did a complete 180-degree turn. They started having Personal Conferences (one-on-one meetings) every week, and they were able to communicate well because the owner started leading the Counselor the way he wanted to be lead.

    In the last 7 months, the owner has expanded her business into other cities, and she says she couldn’t have done this without her sales manager doing a fabulous job and running the company at home.

    The moral of this story is that all leaders should keep in mind that ultimately you are responsible for the actions or inactions of those you lead. The next time you want to complain about anyone on your team, first look in the mirror to see where you can change to be a better leader for your people. The speed of the leader is truly the speed of the team.

     

    Kitty Barrow is a Senior Partner and Executive Sales and Leadership Coach of Southwestern Consulting. She specializes in creating successful systems that are easily duplicated. Her motto is “Keep Things Simple for Stress-less Selling.” Kitty has trained thousands of sales professionals in companies such as Wells Fargo, MassMutual, New York Life, Xerox Global and Allstate


  • Under the Bus You Go

    Guest Post By: Kitty Barrow

    As a sales manager, we’ve all been there, haven’t we? We have all had team members who weren’t performing as they should. Then we hire a new team member, and we fear that the new team member will think the others are role models to follow. So, without really thinking of the consequences, we throw our current team members under the bus by telling the new person to not watch the others because their activity or results aren’t acceptable.

    Wow. How did that help?

    Imagine how confused you would be if you were hired to perform at a higher level than others while other people are left to do as little as they pleased. How would that be fair?

    In working with many sales managers and business owners, we have seen this pattern repeated often. Why? Typically it is because our client is trying to turn around their sales by bringing in new talent, but they aren’t in a place where they can let the other lower-performing team members find success elsewhere.

    This practice is wrong on many levels:

    First, it sends an immediate signal to the new team member that you (their new leader) can’t be trusted to have their back.

    Second, it lets the new team member know that “gossip” is accepted here.

    Third, it sows the seeds of distrust among team members. Any one of these is a problem. All three of these can be fatal for your organization.

    So what is a manager to do?

    Step 1:     Let everyone know the vision of your company. Where do you see everyone going and what do you see them achieving together? Present this to your team early and often. Get everyone excited about the part they play in the success of the team as a whole.

    Step 2:     Before bringing in new sales team members, sit down with your current team individually to discuss their personal and professional goals. Also, apologize if you haven’t been clear in your activity expectations in the past or you haven’t been doing your job as a leader to hold them accountable to doing the things that will help them reach their goals. Let them know that you plan to be a better leader for them because their personal success is important. Set out a reasonable plan for sales activity (referrals, dials, reaches, appointments set, appointments held) and begin tracking them (preferably using our CSF system that will do the math for you with quick and easy reports). Set up weekly one-on-one Personal Conferences (PCs) where you will review their numbers and help them improve in the areas where they need help to achieve their goals.

    Step 3:     Hire your new team member and repeat Step 2 (sans apology). No comparison needs to be made with the current team members. Everyone should be held to their own activity levels, which should be consistent for everyone.

    Step 4:     Prepare for the best and the worst. Best case scenario is that you continue to meet with all team members and work with them to perfect the skills they need in order to hit their activity numbers. You stay consistent with your help and accountability, and they continue to get better at achieving more than they had before. Worst case scenario is that your team members don’t step up to the plate. If they aren’t willing to work toward what is expected of them, then you will need to think about putting them on a Performance Recovery Program (PRP) —or Performance Improvement Program (PIP)—which includes a training program. If they aren’t successful on the PRP, then you will need to be prepared to help them find success with another division of your company or with another company.

    Step 5:     Stay consistent. The best sales leaders are consistently keeping the company vision in front of their team members while also connecting sales and activity numbers to t achieving personal and professional goals. Consistency in casting vision, accountability, and helping them to develop the skills they need to be successful will keep you from ever feeling the need to throw any of your team members under the bus. Instead, you will be lifting them high in recognition for how much they are achieving.

     

    Kitty Barrow is a Senior Partner and Executive Sales and Leadership Coach of Southwestern Consulting. She specializes in creating successful systems that are easily duplicated. Her motto is “Keep Things Simple for Stress-less Selling.” Kitty has trained thousands of sales professionals in companies such as Wells Fargo, MassMutual, New York Life, Xerox Global and Allstate


  • Suck It Up and Drive On

    Guest Post By: Brent Widman

    drive on
    We get told no every day—from the time we wake up until the time we go to bed. It may come in different forms. It may come out of nowhere. We probably don’t even recognize how many times we get told no or tell ourselves no. We do it so regularly that it becomes normal.

    I’m in sales. I not only sell, but I help people sell. There is a lot of “Suck it up” that goes into that. Not only getting past it but also helping others get past it. Let me count the ways:

    There is never enough time.
    Your prospect says, “Not right now. Can you get back to me?”
    You don’t have anyone to call.
    You’ve been calling the same people over and over.
    You’re holding onto that false sense of hope that someone might do business with you.
    You compare yourself to others.
    You’re not hitting your goals.
    Your prospect says, “Call me back in six months.”
    You’re not present in the moment, always thinking about more.
    You’re not reaching your potential.
    You have dreams but aren’t accomplishing them.
    You’re calling people, and they aren’t interested.
    You’ don’t have enough money.
    You don’t want to practice.
    Your prospect says, “I need to think about it. “
    You go on useless appointments.
    You have call reluctance.
    You shut it off at the end of the day. I’ll start tomorrow.

    These are just a few things salespeople go through each and every day. What exactly does it mean to suck it up and drive on?

    As a salesperson, we got into this profession for a reason. Not because we had to, but when it’s all said and done, because we chose to. We chose to get beat up, shot down, put down, argued with, get told no, have a thick skin.

    We did it for so many reasons.

    Maybe we are driven by guilt? We are in student loan debt, credit card debt, house debt, car debt. We may get home at night and our kids or family want us to be home on time or not take those calls. We are driven by doing more because all that is depending on us.

    Some of us are driven by money. We just want to make as much darn money as humanly possible. That’s only going to get us so far. Eventually, we have to find a new reason.

    We may be driven to fill a void. This is our way to win. We want to win that sale, that appointment. We want to get that person to say yes and ride that high.

    Then there’s where most of us fall under—what most of us are driven by.

    We are driven by dreams. Things we want to have. Things we want to achieve. Places we want to go. Things we want to do. We want to provide for our family, kids, spouse, or those around us. Things we want to accomplish. We want to do all those things we never got to do.

    This is exactly why we need to embrace the suck. We are in the number-one profession in the world in that we can make an unlimited amount of money if we do what we are supposed to. If we see past our excuses, take action, work at it, hire a coach and be a student of the game. We need to realize we will never be perfect, and you know what, that’s okay.

    You may miss a goal. You may miss a deadline. You may miss that big sale. Suck it up and drive on. The best part about sales is we always get to start over. Whether it’s the next day, month, or year. We get to do it again; it resets. Go out and do the things you need to do to hit those goals.

    The only person standing in your way is you. Suck it up and love it! It’s worth every second. You will be better at what you do, inside and outside of work. Life happens. Embrace it.

     

    Brent Widman has over 10 years experience in all aspects of sales. He is a professional sales coach at Southwestern Consulting. Brent has expertise in lead generation, prospecting, selling to top execs and the art of follow up. He has worked with numerous individuals to improve their sales processes, day to day interaction and ultimately them as a person. He is a former division director, sales director and district manager for distinguished sales teams in the recruiting, fitness and communications world.


  • It Doesn’t Have To Be All Or Nothing… It Just Has To Be Something

    Guest Post By: Brent Widman

    all or nothing...

    What are you doing to make yourself better?

    As sales people, we tend to skate by. We wing it if you will. We do just enough dials. Do just enough meetings. Ask for referrals to have just enough people to call. Make just enough money. Play the game just good enough to get by.

    So many times we aren’t doing the things it takes to be successful. The thing is, we look at it as it has to be all or nothing. I have to read the whole book. I have to make 50, 75, 100 dials a day or I’m not doing anything. I have to sell X amount to be great. I have to have so many meetings or I’m not doing enough. We put our energy into our results, and not into our activity.

    We get frustrated. We shut down. We stop doing it because it’s not working. We get close, but we can’t see the light. We start making excuses. Telling ourselves we aren’t good enough. People aren’t buying. We might lose our self-confidence. We lose the person that got us to where we are. The person that was doing the work. The person that was doing something, not nothing.

    You’ve heard that consistency is the key. I’m here to tell you nothing will beat it. Consistently asking for referrals. Consistently doing your dials. Consistently setting meetings. Getting in front of people, reading, practicing your language, getting up early, planning your day. Consistently being consistent will conquer all of those things you struggle with daily.

    Consistently putting your energy into your activity and not into your results will get you to where you want to go.

    I was having a conversation with a coaching client the other day. This quote comes from him.  We will call him Kyle. “Doesn’t have to be all or nothing, just has to be something.” That’s the art of not giving up. When you don’t feel like it, you still do it. When you want to stop, you do one more. If it’s 5:00 pm, 6:00 pm or whatever time it is for you, do you stop for the day or do you do one more call?  Do you talk to one more person? If you have to get up early to do something, do you do it? Do you know why?

    Because something is better than nothing.

    I want to thank you, Kyle, for being a true example of this. I want to thank you for being coachable, committed and willing to change when the things you were doing just weren’t working the way they should.

    There are times when doing something is better than doing nothing.

     

    Brent Widman has over 10 years experience in all aspects of sales. He is a professional sales coach at Southwestern Consulting. Brent has expertise in lead generation, prospecting, selling to top execs and the art of follow up. He has worked with numerous individuals to improve their sales processes, day to day interaction and ultimately them as a person. He is a former division director, sales director and district manager for distinguished sales teams in the recruiting, fitness and communications world.


  • How to Better Train in the Field

    Guest Post By: Emmie Brown

    Field training

    I recently had one of my clients come to me and say, “I am not sure my managers are working with people very effectively in the field, can you check it out for me?” After investigating, they weren’t! They were working with their agents all day long in the field, doing the presentations, but expecting the brand new rookies to learn by osmosis. Many times we think we are teaching people how to sell effectively just by having them watch us. It does not really work like that at all! They cannot always just learn this way, they actually have to do what they are learning.

    Someone can sit in a class on how to learn to ride a bicycle and intellectually understand how to balance, or how they need to put one foot down and the other up. It’s not just about reading a book on it or being told that will teach someone, it is actually having someone along side of them helping them stay balanced and figure it out. As a leader, we don’t just need to have the team watch what we do, we actually have to coach them as they go.

    This is a field training methodology. It’s very simple and effective. It’s a formula you can use when you’re working with new people in the field, and you watch each other to help develop new skills.

    The methodology is to watch, show, watch, make it real.

    What you do, and how this works, is you have them do a portion of their presentation, role play a section or the entire thing, and you watch how they do it. When you’re watching, you are not looking for every little thing they are doing wrong, you’re looking for the biggest and most important area. One or two things that you can give them suggestions on, that if they do it, they will improve their presentation and make it better. You’re watching them, and listening for that one piece of advice you can give them.

    The second thing you do is show them. You role play it back to them and have them see what it is that you are wanting them to get in very accurate detail. Then you have them do it again. Watch to see if they improve and use that advice and make sure they know you notice the difference. Now you go make it real. You go out and do the full presentation and apply what was learned.

    The magic about following this formula is that even though you are giving someone one little piece of advice and they are practicing and applying it, over time, if you’re continuing to work with people with this methodology their skills will go from very small, to very adapted.  They are going to be strong, they will be proficient and know how to do things right. It won’t be because they just watched you and tried to pick up what you were doing. You broke it down for them one piece at a time. You followed an effective field training methodology.

    How have you learned to best train your field agents?  Share some key ways you help others grow and learn in your business.

    Emmie Brown is an executive level coach and an expert in the Psychology of Scripting. Emmie started her career with The Southwestern Company as a student intern at the University of North Carolina. She continued to work with Southwestern over the next 10 years as a top producing sales manager until joining Southwestern Consulting in 2009. Emmie has spent the last 4 years traveling the country as a professional sales trainer, executive coach and business consultant with Southwestern Consulting and the Success Starts Now! conference series. She is also the author of the audio series Talk Less, Sell More and a breakout presenter at the Success Starts Now! sales training conference.


  • The “Perfect” Game

    Guest Post By: Gary Michels

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    This game is more of a challenge, I challenge you to view the world as “perfect.” Perfect exactly the way it is and the way it is not. Regardless of your circumstances, you need to view the world as perfect. Begin this challenge by figuring out right now how everything that has ever happened to you has been the perfect thing. You also need to decide that where you have been and what you have done in your life thus far, has led you to where you are today.

    Why is today perfect? You are alive! You have a body that functions! You have opportunities to contribute to the good of mankind and help others achieve happiness. Go ahead, choose anything in your life and declare it perfect. Do it right now! What is perfect in your life? Why is it perfect?

    Every time something happens to you, especially if it is something that was not exactly how you planned it, declare it to be “Perfect!” Then, thank the Universe for bringing that experience to you and allowing you to learn from it. Without failures in your life, you will never know the taste of success. Ask yourself what can be learned from this? How can I grow? Is the action or event you are experiencing teaching you how to be more patient, more of a risk taker, be more giving… or is it giving you feedback letting you know where you are now and what areas of your personality do you want to continue to work on?

    If your leader or manager tells you the commission rate is going down, say “Perfect, I was wondering how I was going to break through barriers and make more sales. Should a prospect you have been counting on to purchase your product or service, suddenly decide not to, you need to say to yourself, “Perfect”. Then, you say to yourself something along the lines of : “I was getting too attached to that deal anyway. I found myself feeling off-kilter because I was so desperate for that one particular sale. The Universe will always provide for me as long as I mean well and work hard.”

    Start playing this “Perfect” game with those around you. Ask yourself what is right about this person? Why have they entered my life? What do I like about them? What are their positive attributes? How can I honor them? You must strive to always be in the “perfect” mindset. It is knowing you are experiencing each moment for a specific reason.

    Remember to ask yourself:

    1. What is perfect today?
    2. What is perfect about my career?
    3. What is perfect about my life?
    4. What is perfect about myself?

     

    Gary Michels is a co-founder of Southwestern Consulting. He is a keynote speaker, sales trainer and business consultant and has motivated nearly 1,000,000 people to achieve their highest potential nationwide. Gary spent 19 successful years as a sales representative for a national fund-raising company.


  • “I’m Sorry” & Customer Service

    Guest Post By: Amanda Johns Vaden

    While reading  new book that I got turned on to called “#GIRLBOSS” by Sophia Amoruso, one of the things she talks about is how important it is to apologize to your customers when things go wrong. Here’s what I believe when it comes to saying, “I’m sorry,” in regards to customer service.

    I believe that you should always take responsibility when things don’t go right in your company. Many times it’s going to be your fault, and many times it’s not. Regardless, they’re still your customers.

    We’ve all heard that old adage saying, “The customer is always right.” Let’s just be honest, that’s not true. The customer is not always right. But regardless, they are still your customers.

    And here’s what I’ve noticed as a customer and a consumer of many types of things: I don’t hear “I am so sorry” or “Let us fix that for you”. In fact, most times, the person on the other line or the person standing behind the counter is trying to inform me why it was my fault, why this didn’t go right, or trying to give me some logical explanation as to why this happened.

    Here’s what I know about apologizing. The more you try to defend yourself or the more you try to reason, the more defensive the other person’s going to get. Although I don’t necessarily believe that you should be sorry for everything that your customers are unhappy about, here’s what I know:

    The quicker that you respond with a genuine empathetic, “I’m sorry this happened to you,” you’re not saying, “I am sorry we did this. I’m sorry that we failed you.” You are saying, “I am sorry that you feel this way. I am sorry that this was your experience.”

    If you can show genuine empathy quickly, all of the negative attitudes tend to diminish. It’s when we don’t apologize. It’s when we don’t take responsibility. It’s when we don’t make an effort to show our customers that we appreciate them as customers that things turn ugly.

    And let’s just be honest. In the world of social media and online feedback, no one can afford a constant barrage of unhappy customers because if you keep your customers unhappy long enough, you’re just not going to have any customers.

     

    Amanda Johns Vaden is a founding partner, executive coach and senior consultant at Southwestern Consulting. She has worked with over 400 sales offices nationwide. Amanda is the author of the upcoming books Unspoken: Redefining Expectations Between Men and Women in the World of Work and 4-Dimensional Follow up: Increasing Client Retention and Customer Loyalty Through Follow-Up


  • Using The Cell Phone Technique To Get Referrals

    Guest Post By: Emmie Brown

    Some people don’t get enough referrals. It could be because they don’t ask for referrals. They may also have some weird or even passive way of asking. Then there are ways of just not asking effectively. For example, “Here’s my business card, if you can think of anyone, let me know.” Or, they may ask, “Do you know of anyone who…” the natural response to that is, “No, I can’t think of anyone right now.”

    The way you ask for referrals determines if you get a lot of referrals. A lot of people will say they are getting a lot of referrals each week, and that a few each week are enough. You should expect to get at least 2 from every appointment you have. I know when I don’t ask for referrals effectively, I don’t get them. I don’t have the connections like everyone else. I get responses like, “I can’t think of anyone.” “Do you have a card, or can you email me?” “If you give me a call next week, I’ll have thought of someone by then.”

    Again, if we are hearing those things, we are not asking for those referrals effectively.  One principle for asking referrals that you need to know is that for every question you ask, there is a transition, a setup to it, it’s a process to asking for referrals. Another principle you should know is that the easier it is for us to have someone think of someone, the more likely they are to give us referrals.

    Here is a technique that makes it easy for people to give you a lot of warm referrals.

    The Cell Phone Technique.

    Now, when you think about it, the reason why this is so powerful is that we don’t store our numbers in a Rolodex anymore and we don’t store too many in our brains. But where we do store them? On our cell phones, that we always have with us! Our Rolodex will be our cell phone we carry that with us everywhere.

    So how this technique works is to first transition. How you can transition here is really simple. At the end of your meeting with someone you’ve just met, wrap up by saying,

    “Thank you so much for meeting with me. This has been great! Do you have your cell phone with you?” And they’ll say yes and you wait for them to bring it out and you say, “I want to give you my personal number for you to put in your phone, if you ever need anything, feel free to give me a call!”

    Just let them know you will provide for them with anything that they need to make them feel important, as they are. This is a better way to be more personal instead of just handing a business card, that will likely to go in hiding somewhere, never to be seen again. This way you are making them feel special.

    This leads to step two; you ask. This is an easy transition because they have their cell phone in their hand, you just have to follow up with saying,

    “Who do you know in there who would be open to talking to me?”

    And you wait, keep it general, don’t let them rule anyone out, and they naturally will take a look through their phone. They will start scrolling through their contacts, and you will likely get lots of referrals this way. Here’s a little bonus tip for asking: It’s not “Do” it’s “Who” do you know.

    Another thing you should do is use memory joggers. As they are thinking and coming up with people, give them examples of who they know in their neighbor. Use memory joggers to get them to think of people that might be a good referral. When you first ask, it’s important that you hush up when you say, “who do you know?” Just be quiet and let them process and think about it! Often times we talk our way out of what they could be thinking about, and not letting them go through with it.

    Another tip is simply to ask, “Anyone else?!” Get excited about that first one, but don’t stop there. Another step further is to get pre-approach. Pre-approach is the background information that you want to know before you call someone. A good question to ask is, “How do you know each other, anything unique about that person?” If you ask that you will get some pretty good information and ways to connect with that person when you call them.

    Lastly, set it up to be successful. Let them know if they want to give their friend a heads up that you’ll be giving them a call. They can relay how well your meeting went and it’s definitely worth taking your call. If you’re able to get them to text them right away and let them know you’re calling they’re likely going answer your call!

    These are some techniques that are going to help you get a lot more referrals and ones that you can work well with! Get to it!

    Emmie Brown is an executive level coach and an expert in the Psychology of Scripting. Emmie started her career with The Southwestern Company as a student intern at the University of North Carolina. She continued to work with Southwestern over the next 10 years as a top producing sales manager until joining Southwestern Consulting in 2009. Emmie has spent the last 4 years traveling the country as a professional sales trainer, executive coach and business consultant with Southwestern Consulting and the Success Starts Now! conference series. She is also the author of the audio series Talk Less, Sell More and a breakout presenter at the Success Starts Now! sales training conference.


  • Impossible…Really?

    Guest Post By: Kitty Barrow

    How do you respond when people tell you that something you want to do is impossible?

    What if the WHOLE WORLD believed what you wanted to achieve was humanly impossible? Not just impossible, but, what if they said reaching your goal could put you in danger and maybe even lead to death?

    Untitled designWould you stop and find a new dream?

    What if you went to a big prospect or a big competition that you had prepared for years to be successful with and you blew it? Would you consider giving up and quitting?

    That is what Roger Bannister did. When he finished 4th in the 1952 Olympics, his dream of winning an Olympics Gold medal was gone. He considered himself a failure and spent 2 months considering if he should quit his sport forever.

    Then he and his coach set a new goal…for him to be the first man to run the mile in under 4 minutes. “Impossible” – right? Experts say that your heart might explode at those speeds!

    Do you think he then went out and suddenly ran that fast? Of course not, he did what all top professionals do…he trained hard. He worked hard. He made his life uncomfortable. He did things that were inconvenient and painful.

    Because this man didn’t listen to skeptics….Because this man decided to put aside his feelings of self-doubt and failure…Roger Bannister will be known forever as having accomplished one of the greatest sports moments ever.

    LET ME ASK YOU….what is your dream? What has God gifted you to do that you are letting yourself believe you can’t do? What excuses or rationalizations are you allowing yourself to believe about what is holding you back?

    Decide today…will I listen to the naysayers (even if the naysayer is between my ears) or will I live my dream and possibly make my mark in history.

    It’s funny sometimes how the choice is all YOURS and the first step is just believing in that.

     

    Kitty Barrow is a Senior Partner and Executive Sales and Leadership Coach of Southwestern Consulting. She specializes in creating successful systems that are easily duplicated. Her motto is “Keep Things Simple for Stress-less Selling.” Kitty has trained thousands of sales professionals in companies such as Wells Fargo, MassMutual, New York Life, Xerox Global and Allstate